Carolyn's Daily Posts: 2011

July 3, 2011

The Start of Marietta and Gallipolis in Ohio

CAROLYN’S DAILY POSTS: 2011

THE START OF MARIETTA AND GALLIPOLIS IN OHIO

    At the end of the American Revolution, the ownership of the Northwest Territory was transferred from Britain to the United States.

     Congress was too poor, too financially exhausted, to pay these men in money. The war had used all its resources.

     This land in the Northwest Territory was a valuable resource that could be used to pay the soldiers for their War service. Congress could trade land grants there for the worthless Continental money these men were paid with. However, Congress didn’t want to deal with the sale of small land tracts.

     This opened the door for land speculators. New Englanders General Rufus Putnam and Brigadier General Benjamin Tupper took hold and found investors who agreed formed the Ohio Company to (more…)

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June 15, 2011

Flatboats: A Major Business in 1700s Redstone, Pennsylvania

CAROLYN’S DAILY POSTS: 2011

FLATBOATS: A MAJOR BUSINESS

IN 1700s REDSTONE, PENNSYLVANIA

     The water where Redstone creek wanders lazily into the Monongahela River near current day Brownsville, Pennsylvania, is shallow. But its location and its width—sufficient to build, dock and outfit numerous river craft—keel boats, flat boats—enabled early entrepreneurs and travelers seeking to settle in the Northwest Territory to build thousands of pole boats.

     Back in 1790, the time period in which my historic romance novel begins, Brownsville was known as Redstone. The community is thirty-seven miles below Pittsburgh, and is where the 1948 Ohio Company built an outpost, an armory and storehouse. The Monongahela River connects the two towns, and water travel was easier than land travel.

     All of the boats in this period were hand-powered, with poles or oars for steering, and usually floated with the current. The flatboat was the cheapest of the many types of boats used to travel on the river. It became the standard conveyance for families moving west.

     Many persons, including entrepreneurs and travelers, built flatboats— which were (more…)

June 3, 2011

Writing About a 1790 Journey to Ohio

CAROLYN’S DAILY POSTS: 2011

WRITING ABOUT A 1790 JOURNEY TO OHIO

Many newcomers to the United States seemed content to settle down upon the coast, whence they could look out upon the expanse of ocean which separated

them from the ideas and theories they had left forever when they spread their sails to the heaven-invoked breezes which were to waft them to a strange but prolific world…unknown source

     The French emigrants who came over to the United States to fulfill their dream of creating a garden of Eden in this country might well have contented themselves by remaining on the seacoast. The Ohio land, for which they held what proved to be invalid deeds, was (more…)

May 21, 2011

The Market Street Arts Festival in Brownsville, PA.

CAROLYN’S DAILY POSTS: 2011

THE MARKET STREET ARTS FESTIVAL

IN

BROWNSVILLE, PA.

 

     It was a delightful warm, sunny, May day—a break in the rainy weather—when my husband Monte and I traveled to Brownsville, Pennsylvania to attend their Market Street Arts Festival.

     While my main goal was to glean background for a set of posts for Carolyn’s Compositions (see link at end of post), there was time to explore other activities. For my research, we visited the Thompson House, the Heritage Center museum located in the Flatiron Building, the junction of the Redstone Creek and the Monongahela River, and Nemacolin Castle—and learned information on the early Methodist meetings.

     We stopped at the food and stage area to find information. We were told that at one time Redstone was expected to outshine Pittsburgh due to its numerous thriving businesses.

     Early in the day a bagpiper strolled through, filling the air with bagpipe notes that delighted everyone. While we were speaking with Norma Ryan, she told us that the young man singing Frank Sinatra’s I Did It My Way was a fifteen year old.

     As we passed by the bandstand, he was commenting about why (more…)

February 27, 2011

Vicious Dog Attacks: Today and Yesteryear

CAROLYN’S DAILY POSTS: 2011

VICIOUS DOG ATTACKS: TODAY AND YESTERYEAR

When I arrived at church, I heard the news. A ten year old child had been viciously attacked by a large dog, and was in the hospital. She required fifty-five internal stitches and seventy-five external stitches. Fortunately, the bites missed the child’s eyes, nose, and mouth.

     That same dog had attacked me a week earlier. It was owned by one of our tenants, Sophia. It had attacked me from behind, knocked me to the ground, and chewed my hand. It left scars even though my hand had been tucked inside my coat pocket.

     Attacking dogs are not a new problem in America.

     The Philadelphia newspapers, in the 1700s and 1800s, were filled with (more…)

February 16, 2011

Grog Recipes

Filed under: INTERTWINED LOVE: My Novel — carolyncholland @ 10:30 am
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CAROLYN’S COMPOSITIONS

GROG RECIPES

     As a member of the Ligonier Valley Historical Society (Pennsylvania), I frequently attend their social and historical events. And often, at their pot luck meals, they serve grog, a beverage of the seafaring until 1970.

     Grog would have been a beverage the French people traveling from de Havre, France, to the United States, to settle in the Scioto region of Ohio. Several of these emigres are characters in my historic romance novel, Intertwined Love, set in the 1790s to early 1800s.

     Grog was introduced to The English Royal Navy in 1740. Vice-Admiral Edward Vernon, a noted seaman, is known as (more…)